Tags

, , ,

Like a lot of dogs, Luke and Dexter can tell time. They know exactly when breakfast should be served, and each one turns into Mister Anxious Pants around 5 p.m. when some human had better be working on their dinner plates. Then, at 8, on the dot, Luke starts asking for his evening Milk (Costco) bone. And, finally, they know that they get a last little bite just before the lights go out and they curl up for the night.

Dog cookies 053

That last treat can range from dried sweet potato strips to dog cookies that look remarkably like vanilla Oreos. After running out of the expensive and sugary cream-filled dog cookies, that I confess I bought because I thought they would look pretty in the glass treat jar I keep in the bedroom, I decided that it would be healthier for them, and less expensive for me, to bake their cookies myself. After all, I make their main meal, so I might as well prepare dessert, too.

I wanted to come up with a recipe that would prove healthy, so I decided against wheat flour. Instead, I went with coconut flour, which is ground toasted coconut. It made the dough (and the house) smell crazy good.

Since egg shells are a good source of calcium for dogs, I’ve been thinking about ways to incorporate them into their food. And that’s where my recipe for dog biscuits takes a slightly different direction from others you might find.

Check out how I made affordable, delicious and healthy coconut-pumpkin doggie cookies.

Dog cookies 003

It doesn’t take a lot of ingredients to make healthy dog treats.

Dog cookies 007

You can find coconut flour at most grocery stores. Look in the baking section.

Dog cookies 008

I prefer crunchy peanut butter, so I figured my dogs would, too. You can use creamy.

Dog cookies 010

Microwave the peanut butter until it’s pourable. It’ll make mixing the dough much easier.

Dog cookies 016

 Place all of the ingredients, except the eggs, in a large bowl.

Dog cookies 005

Now, let’s get to those hard cooked eggs. It sounds crazy, but trust me on this. I want you to drop both hard cooked eggs into a blender.

Dog cookies 020

Yes, the whole shebang. In the blender. Unshelled hard cooked eggs. Not to worry, magic is going to happen. Cover and pulse once or twice.

Dog cookies 022

See? Told you to trust me. 

Dog cookies 025

If you see flecks of shell that look too big, then pulse once or twice more.

Dog cookies 026

Add the eggs to the mixture in the bowl and mix well using a stand or hand-held mixer. About 3 minutes.

Dog cookies 034

Expect the mixture to be crumbly, but it’ll hold together when pressed.

Dog cookies 039

Sprinkle a little of the coconut flour on a work surface. Make a couple of dough balls with the mixture and roll them out to about 1/4-inch thick.

Dog cookies 041

Dog cookies 044

Cut the dough with a cookie cutter and place on a lightly greased cookie sheet.

Dog cookies 046

Bake for about 15 minutes if you’re using a convection oven, and about 20 minutes in a conventional oven.

Dog cookies 048

Place the cookies on a cooling rack and let them sit out until they’re completely cool. They really do look like people cookies, don’t they?

Dog cookies 063

Luke and Dexter are eager to try one of their cookies.

Dog cookies 055

Dexter’s patiently waiting for the OK to pounce on his cookies..

Dog cookies 067

The Very Handsome Luke always has a smile when there’s food around.

Dog cookies 071

Dexter is keeping an eye on his midnight snack.

Dog cookies 079

You can freeze the pumpkin-coconut dog biscuits and pull out a few when needed. Or keep them for several weeks tightly sealed.

Have you tried making your pet’s treats? If so, does your dog have a favorite?

 Easy Pumpkin-Coconut Dog Biscuits

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Makes about 100 1-and-1/2-inch cookies

2 cups coconut flour

1 cup crunchy peanut butter, warmed in microwave until pourable

1 15-ounce can pumpkin puree, not pumpkin pie mix

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

2 eggs, hard boiled, and keep them in their shells

Place all of the ingredients, except the eggs, in a large bowl.

Drop the whole, hard cooked eggs into a blender, cover and pulse a couple times to break up the eggs. They’ll look like fine crumbles. Add the eggs to the mixture in the bowl and mix well using a stand or hand-held mixer. About 3 minutes. Mixture will be crumbly, but will hold together when pressed.

Sprinkle a little of the coconut flour on a work surface. Make a couple of dough balls with the mixture and roll them out to about 1/4-inch thick. Cut with cookie cutter and place on a lightly greased cookie sheet.

Bake for about 15 minutes if you’re using a convection oven and about 20 minutes in a conventional oven, until each doggie cookie is dark golden. Place them on a cooling rack and let them sit out until they’re completely cool. You can freeze them and pull out a few when needed. Or keep them for several weeks tightly sealed.